Contents of the Codex Selden

FIGURE 5. Content overview of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 5. Content overview of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 6. Lord 10 Reed founds Aute, from page 4 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 6. Lord 10 Reed founds Añute, from page 4 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 7. Lady 6 Monkey meets with Lady 9 Grass, from page 7 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 7. Lady 6 Monkey meets with Lady 9 Grass, from page 7 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 8. The marriage of Lord 9 Lizard and Lady 12 Deer, from page 12 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 8. The marriage of Lord 9 Lizard and Lady 12 Deer, from page 12 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 9. Lord 10 Grass and Lady 10 Serpent, last rulers of Aute in the Codex Selden, from page 20 of the Codex Selden.

FIGURE 9. Lord 10 Grass and Lady 10 Serpent, last rulers of Añute in the Codex Selden, from page 20 of the Codex Selden.

The contents of the screenfold are as follows (Figure 5).

Pages 1-5 begin with the supernatural parentage of a man named Lord 10 Reed. After making peregrinations and offerings, he founds the polity of Añute at the top of page 4 (Figure 6). Page 5 lists his descendants, the rulers of the First Dynasty of Añute.

Pages 5-8 chronicle the foundation of the Second Dynasty of Añute. Most of pages 6, 7 and 8 record the life story of the Añute princess Lady 6 Monkey (Figure 7).

The genealogy of the Third Dynasty begins on page 8 with the marriage of Lady 6 Monkey to Lord 11 Jaguar, ruler of a site known as Red and White Bundle. The history of the Third Dynasty runs through page 18. The majority of these pages are parent-children lists, but on pages 11-13 the narrative history of a hero named Lord 9 Lizard is given (Figure 8).

Finally, pages 18-20 list the members of Añute’s Fourth Dynasty, ending with the marriage of Lord 10 Grass and Lady 10 Serpent in 1556 (Figure 9).3

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3 The four-part division of Añute’s dynastic history is based on that proposed by Alfonso Caso (1964). Critiques of this dynastic division can be found in Dennis 1994, 259-261; and Hamann 1998. We retain the four-part division in homage to Caso’s important early work.